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Strength Training

By Learning Forward
December 2012
Vol. 33 No. 6
Bob Bender had been teaching for only three years when in 2005 he was tapped as principal of P.S. 11, a struggling elementary school in New York City. Many might have called his hiring foolish. After all, how could a novice teacher possibly be ready to turn around a school? A closer review of Bender’s résumé reveals how prepared he really was — and how smart that hiring decision would ultimately be. Bender is a graduate of the NYC Leadership Academy, a nonprofit established in 2003 that aims to shape the next generation of school leaders. Through the academy’s Aspiring Principals Program, Bender took courses and spent a year working under the guidance of an expert principal, getting a firsthand view of the ins and

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Authors

Jennifer Gill

Jennifer Gill (jen.gill@comcast.net) is a New Jersey-based writer and editor.

Urban districts from Boston to San Diego are working with nonprofits and local universities to develop high-quality training that helps principals succeed — and stay — on the job. Early signs indicate that investing in training may pay dividends to students.

Urban districts from Boston to San Diego are working with nonprofits and local universities to develop high-quality training that helps principals succeed — and stay — on the job. Early signs indicate that investing in training may pay dividends to students.

References

Corcoran, S.P., Schwartz, A.E., & Weinstein, M. (2009, August). The New York City Aspiring Principals Program: A school-level evaluation. New York, NY: Institute for Education and Social Policy, New York University.

 

Corcoran, S.P., Schwartz, A.E., & Weinstein, M. (2011, February 1). An evaluation of the NYC Aspiring Principals Program, update through 2008-09. Memo to the NYC Leadership Academy. New York, NY: Institute for Education and Social Policy, New York University.

 

Darling-Hammond, L., LaPointe, M., Meyerson, D., Orr, M., & Cohen, C. (2007). Preparing school leaders for a changing world: Lessons from exemplary leadership development programs. Stanford, CA: Stanford University, Stanford Educational Leadership Institute.

 

Louis, K.S., Leithwood, K., Wahlstrom, K., & Anderson, S. (2010). Learning from leadership: Investigating the links to improved student learning. St. Paul, MN: Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement, University of Minnesota & Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

 

Mitgang, L. (2010, December). Flipping the script. The School Administrator, 11(67), 15-18.

 

Orr, M., King, C., & LaPointe, M. (2010, October). Districts developing leaders: Lessons on consumer actions and program approaches from eight urban districts. Boston, MA: Education Development Center.

 

Shelton, S. (2011, April). Strong leaders strong schools: 2010 school leadership laws. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures.

 

Sun, C. (2011, August). School leadership: Improving state systems for leader development. Arlington, VA: National Association of State Boards of Education.

 

Tucker, M. (2011). Surpassing Shanghai: An agenda for American education built on the world’s leading systems. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

 

The Wallace Foundation. (2007). Getting principal mentoring right: Lessons for the field. New York, NY: Author.

The Wallace Foundation. (2012, June). The making of the principal: Five lessons in leadership training. New York, NY: Author.


Learning Forward is the only professional association devoted exclusively to those who work in educator professional development. We help our members plan, implement, and measure high-quality professional learning so they can achieve success with their systems, schools, and students.


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