tools-for-schools-december-2002-january-2003-vol-6-no-3

Read your way to success: How to choose and use articles for presentations

By Joan Richardson

Chuckling at a Dilbert cartoon or reading a thought-provoking article seems to be part of virtually every professional development workshop, presentation, or course.

Read your way to success: How to choose and use articles for presentations

By Joan Richardson

Chuckling at a Dilbert cartoon or reading a thought-provoking article seems to be part of virtually every professional development workshop, presentation, or course.

Asking permission

Seeking permission from the owner of a copyrighted work is an essential part of using an article in a publication or making copies to use in a workshop. Books, articles in magazines, cartoons, music, and videos are all materials that can be protected by copyright.

 


Carousel brainstorm

Carousel brainstorming allows participants to share ideas and build a set of common questions and assumptions before they begin to read.

 


Magnetic questions

This enables teachers to identify key issues and underlying assumptions before they read. This is best used by a large group that will be reading a lengthy article or book together or viewing a videotape.

 


Jigsaw readings

The jigsaw enables a group to read a lengthy article quickly. However, the facilitator must prepare ahead of time by dividing the article into appropriate sections. You can adapt the process depending on the number of participants, the size of your reading, or the next steps you need to take.

 

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