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The Learning System, Winter 2013, Vol. 8, No. 2

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Evaluations serve as pathways for professional growth: Teacher-led teams help build evaluation system that promotes learning

By Valerie von Frank

The New York State United Teachers association led teams of teachers and district administrators from six districts in researching and designing a new teacher evaluation system that includes meaningful dialogues and plans for continued professional learning. Read how the teams transformed the old system from one relying on sole administrator observations to one that incorporates comprehensive, meaningful reviews that involve multiple measures of teacher performance designed to promote teacher learning and growth.

Tool: Personal learning plan

Use this tool to work with teachers to determine their unique learning needs for each standard.

Tool: The New York State United Teachers teacher evaluation and development process

This chart provides an easy-to-understand overview of the four-phase process of the New York State United Teachers teacher evaluation and development process. For each phase, teachers and evaluators share responsibilities for preparation, discussing evidence, and assessing teacher effectiveness in light of the New York State Teaching Standards.

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Advancing the standards: Implementation: The second dimension of professional learning

By Hayes Mizell

Hayes Mizell thinks of professional learning as having two dimensions. The first concerns conceiving, developing, organizing, managing, and producing, or contracting for, activities that engage educators in new learning. Read how the Implementation standard addresses the second dimension of professional learning: what happens after learning experiences, as educators apply, practice, and refine their new learning, and document and assess the results.

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In practice: Addressing diversity requires transparency, fidelity, and modeling

By Kenneth Hamilton

In practice: Addressing diversity requires transparency, fidelity, and modeling
By Kenneth Hamilton