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Jim Knight

Jim Knight (jim@instructionalcoaching.com) is director of the Kansas Coaching Project at the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning and president of the Instructional Coaching Group.

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The moral universe won’t budge unless we move it

By Jim Knight | June 1, 2021

“The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.” —Martin Luther King Jr. Do you agree with King’s often-quoted statement? In light of the heartbreaking and racist events I see in the news almost daily, I can’t say I’m sure. What I do believe, however, is that the moral universe will […]

Real learning happens in real life

By Jim Knight | April 1, 2021

Real learning happens in real life

How to foster hope in tough times

By Jim Knight | February 1, 2021

At the beginning of every new year, I create a playlist for my friends filled with music that brings me joy. I call it my happy list. This year, as I chose my songs, I realized that a theme was emerging: new beginnings. As Nina Simone sings, “It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, […]

Take time for self-care

By Jim Knight | October 1, 2020

We are experiencing at least five major disruptions simultaneously: a global pandemic, fears about the economy, a national reckoning about racism, divisive rhetoric from Washington, and, if we work in schools, a deep uncertainly about what it is that is we actually do as professionals and how, as schools navigate between remote, hybrid, and face-to-face […]

Coaching with students at the center: The what, why, and how of coaching for student engagement

By Jim Knight | January 28, 2020

Coaching expert Jim Knight of the Kansas Coaching Project led an interactive discussion about why and how coaches’ work with teachers should address student engagement. Students who are engaged are more likely to come to class, learn, and ultimately stay in school. This webinar covered how to measure and improve three types of student engagement […]

Students on the margins

By Jim Knight | December 1, 2019

Coaching needs to address student engagement as well as achievement.